MUSINGLY By Karen D'Or

Writing Portfolio, Travel Stories & Other Diversions

Month: March 2012

Krewe of Barkus Great Dane

From No Cal to NOLA

It all changed when my daughter and her wild-eyed cat, Lucy, moved from Sonoma County to New Orleans last year. I became a foodie, I got hooked on accumulating hotel points and airline miles, and I even went to  “Da Track” on Thanksgiving day. My new love affair with vibrant, enchanting New Orleans — so very different from sedate, bucolic Sonoma County — woke up a slightly more tawdry, “laissez le bon temps” side of this native Californian.

With my expatriate child happily employed as a first grade teacher in New Orleans’ historic Tréme neighborhood, we explore great dining spots outside French Quarter. We venture out to many neighborhoods, and continue to find surprising gems: Bywater BBQ meccas; Marigny storefront spots with non-stop music; “Da Track” at the fairgrounds Mid-City – the place to be on Thanksgiving Day!

Ahh the bistros! Whether it’s French, American or New Louisianan, New Orleans know how to treat visitors right in a bistro setting; we enjoy Uptown’s Coquette, Patois, and Lillette. Not only are their dishes delicious, but each spot pulls off signature cocktails, upbeat service, and their own special take on beignets or bread pudding.

For my first February visit, I arrive well before Fat Tuesday hoping to avoid craziness.

Barkus Great Dane

Barkus Great Dane

I quickly learn that Mardi Gras is not a day but I season. So, I catch plenty of parades, and beads. Hint: when New Orleans gets the occasional cold rain and wind folks on the floats throw ENTIRE bags, not strands, of beads. No disrobing required: just plenty of wet, cold, bag-of-bead projectiles to be had.

Thankfully, in Armstrong Park on a warm Sunday afternoon, we find the annual Mystic Krewe of Barkus parade, a zany costume showcase of NOLA’s dogs… and their owners. 

Thank goodness we have portable camp chairs with drink holders: we warm up in the Louisiana sunshine, drink Bloody Marys, and watched the greyhounds, the sheepdogs, the poodles, and my favorite – the Great Dane with “jester” paws.

The Barkus krewe has a good heart. The newly-crowned Queen Maggie is stunning rescued retriever whose was left alone for two weeks after her owner passed away. Queen Maggie is success story from a city that has come back from the brink. I’ll return for Mystic Krewe of Barkus next year with the hopes of seeing more of New Orleans’ triumphs.

 

Olivet Road Vineyard

The Olivet Wine Road

This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series North Bay Everyday

Olivet Road VineyardI drive past Santa Rosa’s Olivet Road too fast, too often. The road is easy to miss bookmarked between two high-speed Sonoma County routes. Now this rural connector street has become my chance to slow down and enjoy a destination neighborhood: not long ago local vintners formed The Olivet Wine Road; hotshot Sonoma County cyclists use the street as a picturesque route to exit town, and nearby is one of Santa Rosa’s juiciest restaurants, Zazu Restaurant and Farm, is on the corner.

It’s Sunday and I am hungry, of course. Thankfully, Zazu Restaurant and Farm, just west of Olivet Road, opens at 9 am. Although Zazu’s fried donuts or Dutch baby pancakes are great excuses for carbo-loading, at this “playful Americana and rustic Northern Italian inspired” converted railroad car, and nationally famous sustainable farm, local meat is revered. In fact, Zazu’s owners (Duskie Estes and John Stewart) were crowned king and queen of pork at the 2011 Aspen Food Festival. I add a side order of black pig bacon to experience Sonoma County homegrown pork.

Unlike other more upscale wine districts, no long ornate driveways, wine-country spas, or billboard-size signs point out the Olivet wineries; the wineries and tasting rooms are interspersed with weathered ranch-style homes – keeping Olivet a hidden niche of the Russian River appellation. Olivet’s curb appeal has not changed much in 25 years: a mixed-used zone close to greater Santa Rosa where apparently the wine growers and their neighbors have figured out how to balance commercial and residential needs.  Turning onto Olivet off Guerneville Road, the first stop is De Loach Vineyards, now owned by the Boisset family of France, who purchased De Loach in November 2003. Next up is Inman Family Wines, organically farmed and a pioneer sustainable practices, Inman is famous for small-lot Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris and upscale rose. Hook and Ladder is across the way, staffed by three generations of the De Loach family, which has been making wines in the region for over four decades. As a last stop, try Harvest Moon, renowned for sweet wines: late Harvest Gewürztraminer and ice wines are a lovely dessert to end the Olivet adventure.

Olivet Road is best considered a detour, not a bypass. Located just west of bustling Santa Rosa it is easy to miss on the way to the bigger name wine destinations, or quaint towns. Here the crunch of gravel beneath the tires makes me slow down, the pungent old-grapey smell makes me inhale longer, and the sight of small working ranches reminds me of traditional Sonoma County country life. Long-time landowners and new entrepreneurs are joining to re-energize this often-ignored side road into a fine detour for dawdlers.


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